Matthew Coleman

Diversity, Inclusion and Allyship in STEMM with QueersInScience

Research, science and innovation benefit from the diverse backgrounds, perspectives and life experiences of the STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine) community. However, the experiences and expertise of marginalised and intersectional groups have not historically been valued for their contributions to the STEMM fields.

This session will focus on exploring the importance of diversity, inclusion and allyship in STEMM, in partnership with QueersinScience. QueersInScience is a national initiative working to build community and improve support for LGBTQIA+ people working in STEMM in Australia.

This session will be delivered by Matt Coleman from QueersInScience. Matt will speak about the growth of QueersInScience from a grassroots movement into a national organisation and discuss lived experience of LGBTQIA+ people in STEMM, strategies for LGBTQIA+ inclusion, support and empowerment, and the road to more meaningful representation and allyship. Learn more about QueersInScience on their website (www.queersinscience.org.au).

Matthew Coleman

PhD student, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

Matt is a first-year PhD student and a founding member of QueersInScience, a national initiative working to build community and improve support for LGBTQIA+ people working in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine) in Australia. Matt completed his undergraduate studies in Bachelor of Arts & Bachelor of Science at Monash University in 2016. He then completed his Honours in 2017 at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, examining X-chromosome inactivation in Rett syndrome. Matt continued to research neurogenetics as a molecular research assistant at the Epilepsy Research Centre in Victoria between 2017 and 2020. Matt returned to the Murdoch Children’s Research in 2020 to commence his PhD, using next generation sequencing for identification of novel disease variants and gene expression patterns in paediatric brain malformation cases.